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Architecture Landscape

Fore Abbey Co West Meath.

Fore Abbey is the old Benedictine Abbey ruin just outside the town of Mullingar. Fore is the anglicised version of the Irish name that signifies “the town of the water-springs” and was given to the area after Saint Feichin’s spring which is next to the old church. It was St. Feichin who founded the ancient Fore Abbey around 630. By 665 there were 300 monks living in the community.

In the 13th century Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath and landlord built a Bendictine priory nearby. Many of the remaining buildings are from the 15th century and have been restored throughout this century. This priory was dedicated to both St Feichin and St Taurin, the Évreux.

The Abbey is also noted for what locals call its 7 wonders:

The monastery built upon the bog.
The mill without a race. St. Fechin reportedly caused water to flow from the ground and operate a mill that had no visible water supply – in reality water from Lough Lene flows through the ground.
The water that flows uphill. St. Fechin reportedly used his staff to make the water flow uphill
The tree that has three branches/the tree that won’t burn. Pilgrims place coins in it, giving it the name “the copper tree.”
The water that doesn’t boil in St Fechin’s holy well.
The anchorite in a cell
The lintel-stone raised by St. Fechin’s prayers.

Categories
Architecture Landscape

Bective Abbey, Co. Meath.

Bective Abbey was Ireland’s second Cistercian abbey, established after Mellifont Abbey in 1147 by the King of Meath. It was one of the country’s most important monastic settlements, as its abbot sat in the Parliament of the Pale. In 1195 the headless body of Hugh de Lacy was reinterred at the Abbey, his head going to St. Thomas’ Abbey, Dublin. the head and body were later reunited and reinterred in St. Thomas’ in Dublin.

After Henry VIII’s suppression in 1543 the Abbey was made into a manor house handed over to civil servants in reward for their loyal work. The earliest remaining stone work dates from 1274 and includes five bays of the south arcade. Also remaining are the claustral and conventual buildings that were reconstructed in the 15th Century. Fortunately the cloisters are beautifully preserved and include a fantastic carved pillar of an Abbot with a crozier kneeling on one of the cloister pillars. Beacuse the structure looked so like a castle it and the nearby Trim Castle were used as locations in teh movie Braveheart.

 

 

 

Categories
Architecture

A Different Perspective

In every town and every city we are faced with a multitude of signs. Stores selling their wares, the latest electronic gadgets to the latest trends in fashion.  Behind this facade of chrome and glass there is usually a hidden history, a different perspective of that place if you will.  From the Elephants above SuperMacs for the Indian Team company which then got adopted by Elvery SPorts to the simple name plate indicating a sight of signifficant historic interest like John Dunlops factory in Dublin where the patent for the first pneumatic tyre was filed from.

 

My intention with this post and the associated gallery will be to capture some small glances back in time through street signs, store fronts and engravings still visible today. it will be an ongoing project capturing these hidden histories of each town and city I travel to which will highlight them in the words of Obi Wan Kenobi “from a certain point of view”.

 

A Different Perspective

 

 

 

Categories
Architecture

Castle Saunderson, Belturbet, Co. Cavan

The Saunderson family acquired the original castle during the Ulster plantation. The original castle was inhabited by the O’Reillys of Breffni and formerly known as Breffni Castle. The present castle dates from the 1840s. One notable member of the family born here was Edward Saunderson, a founder of the Ulster Unionist Party.

Although unoccupied by the Saundersons, the property was not sold by the family until 1977 when it was bought by a businessman who undertook restoration work. For a period it then became an hotel before being sold again in the 1990s after which fire gutted the house. In 1997 Castle Saunderson and its grounds were acquired by what is now called Scouting Ireland which initially appeared to show interest in restoring the building but eventually chose to construct a new centre elsewhere in the grounds.

 

Castle Saunderson

Castle Saunderson

Castle Saunderson

Categories
Architecture

Kilkea Castle

Kilkea Castle was erected in 1180 by Hugh de Lacy, the Earl of Ulster and the Chief Governor of Ireland, for Sir Walter de Riddlesford built a motte and bailey castle on the site in 1180. A grand daughter of his married Maurice Fitzgerald, and the Manor of Kilkea came into the possession of the Fitzgeralds where it remained for over 700 years. The land where the castle was built was once in the Barony of Richard de Clare, known commonly as Strongbow, who played a key role in the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland.

The castle is also associated with Gerald, the 11th Earl of Kildare known as the “Wizard Earl”, who became the male representative of the Geraldines when only twelve years of age after his half brother “Silken Thomas” the 10th earl, was executed at Tyburn in 1537. You can still see an early attempt to ward off evil, in the form of an Evil Eye Stone, a roughly carved depiction of grotesque half-human figures set high in the wall of what was once the guard room.

The Earl died in 1585 and is supposed to return to the castle every seventh year mounted on a silver-shod white charger.[1] In 1634 the castle was leased to the Jesuit Order by the widow of the 14th Earl of Kildare and they remained there until 1646.

 

Kilkea Castle, Co. Kildare. Ireland

Kilkea Castle, Co. Kildare. Ireland

Categories
Architecture Landscape

New Virginia Town brochure

Absolutly delighted to have my photo below selected to be used in the new Virginia Town brochure. this brochure highlights all that wonderful ammenities that Virginia town has to offer.

 

 

Below is a selection of other photos of this wonderful town.

Virginia Town

 

 

 

Categories
Architecture Landscape

Hill of Skryne.

The 15th century Abbey of St.Nicholas atop the Hill of Skryne.

Hugh de Lacy was granted Meath by Henry II King of England in October 1171 and proceeded to build castles to fortify his territory. Skryne was granted to Adam de Feipo, who in turn split it between twenty of his followers.